Why Would A Family Use A Covered Wagon To Travel Westward On The Oregon Trail?

What is the purpose of covered wagons heading west?

As settlers headed west, they needed to carry all of their possessions. They used wagons for travel, and these wagons became their homes on the journey. Large Conestoga wagons were used to carry large shipments of commercial goods.

Why did families travel the Oregon Trail?

Answer: While few women and children were part of the Gold Rush, families traveled together to Oregon to farm. Children were often born on the trail; parents sometimes died, leaving children to be cared for by other family members or members of the wagon train.

Why did people travel in covered wagons?

Food, clothing, tools, and other necessary items were stored within the covered wagon for a journey. Travelers slept in the covered wagon in order to receive protection from both adverse weather conditions and dangerous animals.

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How did settlers travel on the Oregon Trail and why?

From about 1811-1840 the Oregon Trail was laid down by traders and fur trappers. It could only be traveled by horseback or on foot. By the year 1836, the first of the migrant train of wagons was put together. It started in Independence, Missouri and traveled a cleared trail that reached to Fort Hall, Idaho.

Did pioneers sleep in covered wagons?

Some pioneers did sleep in their wagons. Some did camp on the ground—either in the open or sheltered under the wagon. But many used canvas tents. Despite the romantic depictions of the covered wagon in movies and on television, it would not have been very comfortable to travel in or sleep in the wagon.

How much did a covered wagon cost in the 1800s?

It was costly— as much as $1,000 for a family of four. That fee included a wagon at about $100. Usually four or six animals had to pull the wagon.

What was the greatest cause of death on the Oregon Trail?

, being crushed by wagon wheels and injuries from handling domestic animals were the biggest accidental killers on the trail. Wagon accidents were the most common. Both children and adults sometimes fell off or under wagons and were crushed under the wheels.

Why didn’t most pioneers ride in their wagons?

Teams of oxen or mules pulled the wagons along the dusty trail. People didn’t ride in the wagons often, because they didn’t want to wear out their animals. Instead they walked alongside them, getting just as dusty as the animals. The long journey was hard on both people and animals.

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What was the most common disease on the Oregon Trail?

Dysentery, smallpox, measles, mumps, and influenza were among the diseases named in diaries and journals, but cholera, mountain fever, and scurvy were probably the biggest killers.

How far did the pioneers typically walk each day for 6 months?

Average distance covered in a day was usually fifteen miles, but on a good day twenty could be traveled.

What were old wagons called?

A wagon was formerly called a wain and one who builds or repairs wagons is a wainwright. More specifically, a wain is a type of horse- or oxen-drawn, load-carrying vehicle, used for agricultural purposes rather than transporting people.

What animals pulled the covered wagons?

Teams of 10 to 12 horses or mules or six yoked oxen typically were used to pull one of these wagons, with mules and oxen generally preferred. Ideally, several more animals would be kept in reserve to replace those that became lame or worn-out along the route.

Why did Pioneers go to Oregon?

There were many reasons for the westward movement to Oregon and California. Economic problems upset farmers and businessmen. Free land in Oregon and the possibility of finding gold in California lured them westward. Most of the pioneer families either followed the Oregon-California Trail or the Mormon Trail.

Can you walk the Oregon Trail today?

The 2,000-mile Oregon Trail was used by pioneers headed west from Missouri to find fertile lands. Today, travelers can follow the trail along Route 66 or Routes 2 and 30.

How many died on the Oregon Trail?

Combined with accidents, drowning at dangerous river crossings, and other illnesses, at least 20,000 people died along the Oregon Trail. Most trailside graves are unknown, as burials were quick and the wagon trains moved on.

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