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Pendleton: Bowman Building

The year is 1886. Wells Fargo wants to put in one of their banks in Pendleton Oregon; they want it in the Bowman Hotel. With the Bowman being right across from the Union Pacific Train Station, it was a prime location for the bank. Plans needed to be made for the transport of strong boxes full of valuables from the Station to the Hotel. One of these plans called for tunnels to go directly from the baggage room in the train station to the elevator in the basement of the Bowman, and then upstairs to the safe in the Wells Fargo office.

This tunnel was used for many years. Later when Wells Fargo had moved out of town and prohibition was passed; the tunnel came to life in another way. Pendleton, never wanting to be a dry town, created some of the more unusual speak-easies in the area. One of the better known speak-easies was in the basement of the Bowman. You entered down the stairs in the back of the building, gave your password, and went directly to the bar. To the right of the bar was a fireplace and above the fireplace were two lights, a red one and a green one. When the red light came on, that meant trouble and the cops were raiding the speak-easy, so the bartender would pull back the fireplace to reveal a hidden room. This hidden room was actually what was left of the tunnel that ran across to the train station, but the station had moved by then, so you could just make it under the street before you ran out of tunnel. The patrons would wait until the green light came on inside the hidden room, then they would re-enter the bar room and resume their festivities.

When Pendleton had passenger trains, the Bowman Hotel, a three-story brick building across from the railroad depot, was the place to stay. Completed in 1905 by rancher and sheep man O.P. Bowman, this hotel replaced an earlier wood hotel, also called the Bowman Hotel. With the decline in rail traffic the building evolved to an office building, its current use. A local developer bought the building in 2008 and completed a façade restoration while retaining much of the historic interior design and finish.

Funding/Leverage

  • Total project: $16,000
  • Pendleton Development Commission: $10,000
  • Private funds: $6,000

Community Benefits

  • Provided jobs through private contractors
  • Contributes to the historic fabric of the historic district in which it is located
  • Provides low cost office space in downtown Pendleton

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Pendleton: Wayfinding Signage

One of the first recommendations from a tourism promotion consultant, hired by the Pendleton Chamber of Commerce, was that the city install a well-designed directional signage program, one that enhanced the Rodeo City’s brand. The Chamber’s Tourism Promotion Committee set a goal of designing, producing and installing the new signage prior to the 100th anniversary staging of the Pendleton Round-Up.

The process took two years, including multiple presentations to the Pendleton Development Commission, asking for urban renewal funding for the signs. Other sources included Travel Pendleton, the tourism promotion arm of the City, and the Wildhorse Foundation, the charitable giving arm of the Confederated Tribes of the Umatilla Indian Reservation.

Funding/Leverage

  • Total project cost: $102,000
  • Urban renewal funding from the Pendleton Development Commission was $72,000 for production and installation
  • Travel Pendleton: $5,000 for initial designs
  • Pendleton Chamber: $5,000 for design and production
  • Wildhorse Foundation for consultant: $20,000

Community Benefits

  • Provided jobs through private contractors
  • Contributes to the Pendleton brand, known for its rodeo, the Pendleton Round-Up
  • Provides attractive directional signage for visitors
  • Informational kiosks bring shoppers to downtown businesses
  • Provides design format for additional signage.

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Pendleton: Riverfront Plaza

The Umatilla River runs through Pendleton and creates a perfect place for residents to approach nature within the city. The river is home to a variety of birds, water animals such as beaver and river otter, under a canopy of woodland. The signature bird for the river is the blue heron, seen often catching fish in the river. The Riverfront Plaza park is only the first of what are envisioned as places to increase the connections to the river from streets nearby. The one-block park provides immediate access to the River Parkway, a paved path along the river running from one end of Pendleton to the other.
Although most of the expenditures for urban renewal by the Pendleton Development Commission have funded private development partnerships, there have been several purely public projects, including the Riverfront Plaza. A quiet retreat for much of the year, it is jammed with spectators during Pendleton’s annual Round-Up rodeo, as two parades during Round-Up week wind their way by this park.

Funding/Leverage

  • The Riverfront Plaza had a not-to-exceed budget of $400,000
  • 100% of the funding was urban renewal funding through the Pendleton Development Commission
  • There was no private funding
  • There was no other public funding but the city public works department provided engineering and contract management

Community Benefits

  • Provided jobs through private contractor
  • Opens new access to the Umatilla River
  • Improves the environment of the immediate neighborhood, with residences on both sides
  • Supports new development in the River Quarter, per the Urban Renewal plan
  • Supports tourism

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Pendleton: Round-Up Gateway

As the Pendleton Round-Up approached its 2010 centennial celebration, the Round-Up Association and supporters had raised millions of dollars to refurbish the Round-Up arena, including replacing old, uncovered grandstands with new covered grandstands and the design and construction of the Round-Up Centennial Plaza, with its dominant bronze statue of a bronc rider in front of the arena’s new gates. Nearby is a complicated intersection of several roads and the railroad that is the gateway to the Round-Up arena. In conjunction with other preparations for the centennial, this intersection was re-designed to both change the traffic pattern and increase its attractiveness. New landscaping, paving, fencing and structural designs were included in a cooperative effort of the city of Pendleton, the Pendleton Development Commission, the Oregon Department of Transportation and the Union Pacific Railroad.

Funding/Leverage

  • From an original budget of $1.5 million the project was completed for $1,004,000
  • Urban renewal funding from the Pendleton Development Commission was $384,000
  • Unknown private costs were incurred by Union Pacific Railroad
  • Other public funding came from ODOT, $720,000. In addition, the city provided design, engineering and landscaping assistance
  • Once the project was complete the city parks department assumed responsibility for maintenance of landscaping

Community Benefits

  • Provided jobs through private contractors
  • Beautifies a previously ugly intersection
  • Improved safety of the RR crossing with new fences
  • Improved traffic patterns for safety
  • Supports tourism

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Pendleton: St. George Plaza

As the tallest building in Pendleton, the St. George Plaza dominates Main Street in downtown Pendleton. Built in 1900 as the two-story St. George Hotel, owners changed its Italianate style to art deco in the 1930s and added more stories. The now six-story structure was purchased in 2009 by a private developer who proceeded to refurbish the building from top to bottom as a downtown apartment complex. Improvements included removal of walls, then reconfiguration of living units, installation of new kitchens, bathrooms and building technology, a new external fire escape and façade renovation. A restaurant and lounge opened on the ground floor.

Funding/Leverage

  • Total project cost for exterior renovations: $1.6 million
  • Urban renewal funding from the Pendleton Development Commission was $443,723
  • Bank financing: $1,114,198

Community Benefits

  • Provided jobs through private contractors
  • Contributes to the historic fabric of the historic district in which it is located
  • Provides 26 market-rate living units in downtown Pendleton, supporting downtown merchants and restaurants
  • As of 2016 downtown commercial occupancies are at 96%
  • St. George has remained at 100% occupancy

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Winston HV Cellars

The HV Cellars Project is an Urban Renewal project consisting of the redevelopment/rehabilitation of a derelict building and blighted property at the east entry to the City of Winston on the north side of Hwy 42. The building owner, Terry Luce, converted the old building into a Winery and tasting room for HV Cellars.

Funding/Leverage

  • The Winston URA purchased the building for $90,000 and resold it to the developer for $50,000. The URA also contributed $150,000 toward the in building improvements.
  • The new owner of the Building also contributed $150,000 toward building improvements.

Community Benefits

  • The project put a new face on the entry to the City and adds to the tourism activities in and around the City.
  • The project will ultimately employ 2-4 employees and add additional AV to the urban renewal area.

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Dallas: Blue Garden

The Dallas Urban Renewal Agency awarded a $10,000 facade improvement grant, to the property owner to rehabilitate the front façade of the historic Blue Garden building, located on Main Street in Dallas. The Urban Renewal Façade Grant was in turn used as leverage to secure an additional $20,000 grant from the Oregon Heritage’s Diamonds in the Rough grant program for facade improvements.

Funding/Leverage

  • Total façade improvement costs = $50,762
  • The URA provided a $10,000 grant
  • Private participation = $20,762
  • Other public participation = $20,000

Community Benefits

  • In process of restoring interior to create a new restaurant in Downtown Dallas that will create 5-10 new jobs.
  • Local electrician, painters, tile company were hired to help complete the project.
  • Restored community pride and interest in revitalizing Downtown.
  • Five new businesses have opened in the Downtown since the project was completed.

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Redmond: Cook Crossing

Cook Crossing will have 36 one-bedroom and 12 two-bedroom units. The units range in size from 642 to 980 square feet and will come complete with dishwasher, range, refrigerator, garbage disposal, heat pump, and window coverings. Cook Crossing will offer a place for seniors to live that will provide a full life and opportunity to age in place.

The Project will benefit the Urban Renewal District economically, socially, and aesthetically. Cook Crossing will bring housing to the area, a community space, and a full service medical clinic. The Project will help address City Council and Urban Renewal goals including:

  • Economic Development: The Project helps develop and maintains an environment that promotes and supports a strong, healthy, and diverse economic base.
  • Urban Renewal: The Project invests resources to encourage new business investment in designated blighted areas that will grow the job base and strengthen and diversity the tax base in the area.

Project is under construction and with scheduled completion summer 2017.

Funding/Leverage

  • $12,214,911 Total Project
  • $150,000 Urban Renewal

Community Benefits

  • Bring much needed housing
  • Location central to shopping, dining, & transit
  • Project provides much needed medical clinic

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Springfield: Development Program

Development within the City of Springfield is
required to pay a one-time systems development
charge (commonly referred to SDCs) for impacts of
the development on local and regional systems.
These fees are both necessary and costly.

An ongoing program established in 2010, the
Springfield Urban Renewal System Development
program pays the full cost of all local SDCs charged
to a development within a Springfield urban renewal
area.

Funding/Leverage

  • Typical costs associated with these SDC
    charges can range from 2-15% of the
    construction costs. This can result in a range
    of $50,000 to $500,000 and sometimes
    higher depending on the use and investment.
  • To date, the program has paid over
    $400,000 in private development SDCs
  • Private development remains responsible for
    paying any regional SDCs imposed
    (wastewater and/or parks district)

Community Benefits

  • SDCs are associated with the addition of
    new and valuable improvements within the
    increment districts
  • Six new businesses have located and
    invested capital in improving taxable value
    in Springfield urban renewal districts
  • This incentive program has assisted in the
    generation of over $10M in private
    development investment

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Beaverton: Tenant Program

The Beaverton Urban Redevelopment Agency (BURA) is encouraging revitalization of downtown Beaverton, including increasing the number of and enhancing existing restaurants, brewpubs, wine bars and growleries.

The purpose of Beaverton’s Tenant Improvement (TI) Program is to partner with food and drink-based business owners and related property owners interested in opening a new business or renovating/expanding a current business by providing matching interior construction grants.

Eligibility

Businesses are eligible if they meet the following criteria:

  • The business is a food and/or beverage based business. Examples include restaurants, coffee shops, and wine bars.
  • The business is open to the public. Businesses that only provide services to members are not.
  • The business is located within the Downtown Program Area.
  • National chains are not eligible for this program.

Funding/Leverage

  • BURA will provide a 50% match of eligible costs with a maximum grant of $25,000.

Community Benefits

  • The TI Program is an effort towards making Beaverton the premier restaurant destination in Beaverton.
  • In addition, the program will support increasing the number of restaurants currently existing around Watson Ave and 1st Street in Downtown Beaverton, a burgeoning restaurant row.

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Beaverton: Storefront Program

Storefront appearance is a critical aspect of the overall aesthetic appeal and unique character of a commercial district. The Beaverton Urban Redevelopment Agency (BURA) is committed to helping Beaverton small businesses thrive. A key part to business success is that first impression: what a customer sees from the outside of the building. The purpose of the Storefront Improvement Pilot Program is to encourage businesses and property owners within eligible program areas to improve their storefronts, making these areas more attractive to shoppers and increasing the economic vitality and attractiveness to new investment. This program offers architectural design services and construction matching grants to help boost curb appeal and draw in more customers.

Types of Grants

There are two types of grants that are offered:

  • Design Services Grant
    A contracted architect is available to help with concept development or full scope creation, resulting in documents needed to obtain bids.
  • Implementation Grant
    The Implementation Grant covers a portion of the actual improvements to the exterior of a building.

Funding/Leverage

  • Design Services Grants are 100% funded.
  • Implementation Grants have a maximum grant amount of $35,000. A level 1 grant contains a 50% city match for minor projects such as paint and new signage only. A level 2 grant contains a 70% city match for major projects such as new windows, awnings and lighting.

Community Benefits

  • Storefront restoration has a significant impact in the character and vitality of an area and it begins the transformation in that area.

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Beaverton: DOS Program

The City of Beaverton is now offering two Development Opportunity Strategies (DOS) grant options to explore development opportunities in key areas of the city: DOS Design Services and DOS Matching Grant.

The DOS Design Services grant provides fully funded conceptual design and feasibility analysis to understand site opportunities (equals $5,000 in free consultant services contracted by the city).

The DOS Matching Grant provides up to $25,000 in matching grants (50%) per site to explore development opportunities in key areas of the city. This program will enhance livability and attract new jobs to Beaverton’s Urban Renewal District by incentivizing increased density in matching grants to hire real estate development consultants to help further understand and identify development opportunities for vacant and underutilized properties.

Site/Development Eligibility Criteria

The following list includes some of the program’s key eligibility criteria:

  • Site must be located within the Urban Renewal District.
  • Program Participants must have site control (own, contract to purchase, ground lease, etc.)
  • Eligible concepts include significant rehabilitation, redevelopment or new development of significant building scale. Proposed concept project must provide significant increases in density and/or employment.
  • The Projects should be able to be constructed within 5 years or less.
  • Funding preference will be given to projects that meet one or both of the following:
    • Are located within RC-TO, RC-OT, IND or OI zones within the Urban Renewal District
    • Provide mixed-use development and/or high-density vertical housing with building frontages up to the street (in applicable zoning).
  • Funds are available for eligible Program Participants on a first come, first serve basis.

Funding/Leverage

  • The City of Beaverton will provide a 50% grant match up to $25,000 and $5,000 grant for design services.

Community Benefits

  • The City of Beaverton provides $100,000 in grant funds to assist property owners and developers with redevelopment within the Beaverton Urban Renewal District.

Download Project PDF