Albany: Woodwind Apartments

The Woodwind Apartments is a transformational project for the Main Street neighborhood of Central Albany. The site, located on a high-visibility corridor, had been a blight on the community with thirty significantly deteriorated mobile homes, substantial police activity and uncooperative property owners.

Through a collaborative partnership with Innovative Housing, Inc. (IHI), the Central Albany Revitalization Area (CARA) was able use urban renewal funds as the critical gap financing, which made this development possible.

The project included demolition and removal of the mobile homes, environmental cleanup of old oil tanks, construction of 54 workforce apartments (1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-bedroom units).

Benefits and amenities of the project were significant: Community room, Children’s playground, classic design that blends with the historic neighborhood, 85 parking spaces, restoration of the canyon along Periwinkle Creek including a public path, resident services such as budgeting, homework help for kids, a commitment to use local contractors and materials, and sustainable elements to the buildings and site.

Funding/Leverage

Funding for this project was provided by the Central Albany Revitalization Area, Oregon Housing and Community Services, Raymond James Tax Credit Fund, JPMorgan Chase, and Network for Oregon Affordable Housing and Energy Trust. Total project was $10.6 million.

  • Bank, Special Rate Mortgage – $1 million
  • Tax Credits – $7,633,437
  • Grants (Oregon Housing) – $300,000
  • Urban renewal participation – $1.45 million (14%)

Community Benefits

  • 54 units of much-needed workforce housing
  • Elimination of blight and lowering of crime rate
  • Commitment to use local vendors for 15% of project costs
  • Annual property taxes of $25,000

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Government Camp: Waterline

Prior to the establishment an Urban Renewal District in Government Camp, the community was serviced by a private water company with lines too small to provide the supply necessary for most development. Fire protection was also substandard with very few hydrants.

The Development Agency initiated several projects thatresulted in installation of approximately 13,000 feet of water mains and 26 hydrants throughout the community.

Funding/Leverage

The total cost for installation of all lines and hydrants was approximately $1,400,000. Urban renewal funds were the sole source for the projects.

Community Benefits

With the project now complete, the entire community has access to water that will supply the necessary flow for development and fire suppression. Development projects that were able to be realized because of the waterline projects include:

  • Collins Lake Condominiums – 128 units
  • Westlake Lodge – 48 units
  • The Lodge at Government Camp – 8 condos and 8,000sf of retail space
  • Tyrolean Meadows Subdivision – 32 lots

In addition, there are approximately 180 acres of land available for development that now have water mains nearby, eliminating what was a significant obstacle to redevelopment.

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Clackamas: Hawthorne Park

The Agency entered into a development agreement for the Hawthorne Grove project, which was constructed on SE King Road in the North Clackamas Revitalization Area Urban Renewal District. The project consisted of 29 condominium units, with 10 having their affordability guaranteed via affordability covenants, and a neighborhood park. All of the Hawthorne Grove housing units were completed by the end of 2011. The North Clackamas Revitalization Area plan, developed with citizens in the area, clearly identified a need to provide additional recreational/open space within the district. To address this need, the Agency purchased a portion of the project site for the development of a neighborhood park. The Agency was able to leverage funds by securing a Metro Nature in Neighborhoods Grant and a Local Government grant from Oregon State Parks for construction of the park. Hawthorne Park was completed and opened in the fall of 2012.

Funding/Leverage

  • The Agency provided $250,000 for the construction of the housing units, in exchange for an affordability covenant being attached
    to ten units. The Agency also purchased the park space for $250,000. Partners included a private developer, Metro, Oregon State Parks, and the North Clackamas Parks and Recreation District (NCPRD).
  • The Agency contributed $85,000 for park development and construction.
  • Metro provided a Nature in Neighborhoods grant of $140,000 for park construction.
  • Oregon State Parks awarded a Local Government grant of $50,000 for park construction.

Community Benefits

  • Increased the inventory of quality affordable housing in the community.
  • Provided a much-needed park and recreation space in local community.

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Clackamas: Multorpor Overpass

Government Camp is bisected by Highway 26. The only access to all property south of the highway, which includes Skibowl east ski area, was a narrow overpass at Multorpor Drive. There is approximately 80 acres of developable land on the south side that likely will not occur without improved access. In order to maximize development potential and improve multi-modal circulation for the community, the Development Agency replaced the existing overpass with a new structure that includes a three-lane road section, sidewalks and lighting. Multorpor Drive was also improved with similar features from the commercial core area to the Skibowl parking lot, a distance of approximately 2,000 feet. Design elements are consistent with the Cascadian architecture theme adopted by the community. Utilities were also extended through the project area in order to have service readily available for future development.

Funding/Leverage

Urban Renewal funds provided the match needed in order to receive a significant FHWA grant. County System Development Charge funds were also used on the project.

  • Agency contribution: $2.26 million
  • FHWA contribution: $2.14 million
  • SDC’s: $1.6 million

Community Benefits

  • Provides the infrastructure necessary for development to occur south of the highway, as planned.
  • Greatly improved access to a major tourist destination.
  • Improved emergency vehicle access.
  • Improved clearance for freight movement on Highway 26.
  • Provides the only grade-separated pedestrian crossing over Highway 26.

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Clackamas: NCRA Sanitary Sewers

Portions of the North Clackamas Revitalization Area (NCRA) that lacked sewer service were annexed into Clackamas County Service District No.1 in 2008 – the first step toward providing sanitary sewer service to all residents in this community. Nearly 1,200 properties in the NCRA did not have access to sewer service. Design for the new system began in fall 2008 and construction started in fall 2009. All three phases of construction were completed by fall 2012. The Agency supported these efforts by providing capital funding to the project in the amount of $2,200 per eligible property to help offset the cost of hooking up to the sewer line. The Agency provided an additional $1.5 million contribution toward sewer construction costs to reduce assessments by $1,250 per eligible property. The Agency also implemented a Safety Net grant program in 2013 to assist low-income homeowners in the area by paying the principal on their annual sewer assessment fees. The program will run on an annual basis and will continue through the 20-year payment period.

Funding/Leverage

Funding for the project was provided by the Clackamas County Development Agency, and Community Development Block Grant funds. Total Agency construction contributions:

  • $1.5 million toward construction costs, decreasing sewer assessments for each property by $1,250.
  • $1 million for the Safety Net Program
  • $2,200 per eligible property toward construction, which acted as an offset for system development charges. This reduced hook-up costs for nearly 1,200 properties.
  • Community Development Block Grant funds: $300,000 for road repaving following sewer installation.

Community Benefits

  • Replaced aging and failing septic systems.
  • Improved health, safety and welfare of the community.
  • Reduced financial hardship of the sewer connection for low-income homeowners in the area.
  • Increased attractiveness of area for new development.

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