Lincoln City: Glass Art Studio

The Lincoln City Urban Renewal Agency purchased property in the Taft district and supported the development of a privately-operated glass art studio. The Jennifer L Sears Glass Art Studio attracts about 80,000 people a year and the glass floats that are created there have become an iconic symbol for Lincoln City. A 2011 survey by the Lincoln City Visitor and Convention Bureau (VCB) showed that 37% of the visitors to Lincoln City who answered the survey come to visit the Glass Studio, and 99% say they will tell family and friends to come see the studio. These visitors are estimated to add $8 million dollars annually to the hospitality community in Lincoln City. The VCB also estimates that they receive about $2 million annually in editorial press: press for which they do not have to pay anything but are featured in publications like Sunset Magazine, the Wall Street Journal, and The Oregonian. Visitors come from all over the United States to both watch art being created and to create their own glass art pieces in the Glass Studio.

Funding/Leverage

  • Lincoln City Urban Renewal Agency purchased property, a former brownfield site to include:
    • $52,200 for the building
    • $30,000 for business relocation
    • $30,000 for site clean-up & monitoring
    • $30,000 for building improvements
  • Partnership with the Lincoln City Visitors and Convention Bureau – Purchase of studio equipment
  • Private investment for additional furnace, equipment

Community Benefits

  • Employees 12 (18 in summer)
  • Attracts over 80,000 visitors a year
  • Staff works with kids from 8 to 98 years old
  • Visitors created 50,000 glass projects over 10 years
  • Produces floats for the popular Finders Keepers Glass Float Program – from mid-October to Memorial Day each year “Float Fairies” hide over 2,000 floats on the beach for residents and tourists to find.

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Coquille: Business Assistance

In 2014 the Coquille urban renewal area had four small projects assisting businesses with improvements to their properties.

The Sawdust Theatre is one of the community’s most prized gems. This community melodrama theatre has been performing for almost 50 years. Beginning last year they sought assistance from the urban renewal agency to pay for new siding. Due to the considerable size of the building and the need for a new roof, they completed the work in phases for budgeting and fundraising purposes.

The Coquille Broiler simply bought a new sign to replace the old one hanging on the corner of the building.

The Coquille Produce and Deli market resided the façade of their building with a rustic look re-using lumber from an old barn.

Bill’s Place was an old building that used to be a bar with apartments upstairs. The building was deteriorated beyond repair and the owner utilized urban renewal funds to pay for the demolition.

Funding/Leverage

  • The Coquille business assistance program provided for up to $20,000 of matching funds per project per year.
  • URA funding: matching grants up to $20,000 per project per year
  • Bill’s Place and the Sawdust Theatre projects greatly exceeded the scope of the match and each utilized the full amount.
  • The smaller projects received half of their funding in urban renewal match.

Community Benefits

  • Assistance for the community-based Sawdust Theatre building improvements
  • Removal of a deteriorated and dangerous building in the core of downtown
  • Improved visibility and environment for local businesses

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Wilsonville: I5 Interchange

Improvements to Wilsonville Road at the I-5 interchange were necessary to meet traffic concurrency requirements in Wilsonville and allow continued development activity. Specifically, this project was necessary for the redevelopment of the former Dammasch State Hospital into a new mixeduse development with over 2,300 residential units, the expansion of a Coca-Cola bottling facility, and the development of a new Fred Meyer retail center.

This project, which was completed in 2012, also included bike and pedestrian safety improvements and artistic enhancements. Wilsonville K-12 students participated in a year-long project to design and produce a tile mural that was installed under I-5 next to a new pedestrian pathway.

Funding/Leverage

  • The total project cost was$21 million
  • Urban renewal contributed $12 million.
  • Other funding, including ODOT match and SDCs, was $9 million

Community Benefits

  • Over 2,300 new housing units
  • 1,892% growth in URA Assessed Value from 2003 to 2015
  • Private redevelopment of approximately 220-acres of publicly-owned property
  • Development of a Fred Meyer retail center
  • Job creation due to the expansion of a Coca-Cola bottling facility
  • Improved traffic flow
  • Improved safety and connectivity for pedestrians and cyclists

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Wilsonville: Canyon Creek Road

The Canyon Creek Road extension project established a much-needed north/south connection between employment and residential lands in the north of Wilsonville to the Town Center commercial district. The project abuts a 43.4 undeveloped industrial parcel and 21.54 undeveloped acres of residentially-zoned land.

This project was completed in the spring of 2015 and is expected to leverage private-sector development on the adjacent vacant parcels. Additionally, the extension of Canyon Creek Road into Wilsonville’s Town Center provides both enhanced vehicle capacity and improved bicycle and pedestrian connectivity. Employees at firms like Mentor Graphics and Xerox can now walk easily to Town Center retail services, parks, and other amenities.

Funding/Leverage

  • The total project cost was $3.8 million
  • Urban renewal contributed $3.5 million
  • Developer contribution of $.3 million

Community Benefits

  • Improved traffic circulation
  • Infill of bike and pedestrian connections
  • Improved connections between employment and residential areas and the Town Center commercial center
  • Construction of road improvements necessary to serve future industrial and residential development

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Wilsonville: Barber Street

The Barber Street improvement project is a threephase project with the final phase completed in September 2015. Earlier phases included improvements necessary for the construction of a transit center and park and ride facility for Wilsonville’s South Metro Area Regional Transit (SMART) and the Westside Express Service (WES) commuter rail line.

This project was also necessary for the redevelopment of the former Dammasch State Hospital into a new mixed-use development with over 2,300 residential units. The final phase of the project bridges the Coffee Creek wetlands complex and connects new residences in the Villebois transitoriented master plan area with the transit center and employers on the east side of the wetlands.

Extending Barber Street across the wetlands also enhances public safety by providing a direct connection between a Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue station on the east of the wetlands with Villebois on the west.

Funding/Leverage

  • The total project cost for all three-phases of Barber Street improvements was $12 million
  • Urban renewal contributed $7.7 million.
  • Project funding included $4.3 million in federal funds.

Community Benefits

  • Over 2,300 new housing units
  • 1,892% growth in URA Assessed Value from 2003 to 2015
  • Private redevelopment of approximately 220 acres of publicly-owned property
  • Improved emergency services access
  • Improved workforce access to transit services

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Salem: Edgewater & 2nd Street

In December 2013, Salem’s Urban Renewal Agency completed major projects identified in the 2010 Edgewater-Second Street Action Plan (Action Plan). The Action Plan focused Urban Renewal resources on near-term projects to enhance the “main street” function and feel of Edgewater Street, and improve access to encourage redevelopment on 2nd Street. As a result, two blocks of 2nd Street were completely reconstructed, and Edgewater Street was enhanced to better serve pedestrians. These West Salem Urban Renewal Area funded projects were further enhanced by coordinating schedules with City infrastructure investments in adjacent areas.

2nd Street Reconstruction: Enhanced Vehicle and Pedestrian Circulation
For many years after the railroad stopped operating in West Salem, an unpaved gravel median separated City-maintained travel lanes along two blocks of 2nd Street NW. Now, 2nd Street is a pedestrian friendly environment with new sidewalks, pedestrian medians and curb extensions, street trees, customer parking, improved lighting, underground utilities, and stormwater upgrades. These investments also encourage the area’s future mixed use development with the aim of achieving the long-term vision for 2nd Street of more housing and commercial uses to support the mix of commercial uses on Edgewater. The project was completed in December 2013.

Edgewater Pedestrian Safety and Access Improvements
In 2012, to encourage more pedestrian activity and enhance pedestrian safety in the Edgewater District, pedestrian lighting and curb extensions were installed on Edgewater Street at Kingwood, Gerth, McNary and Patterson.
By including curb extensions to the multi-use pathway and sidewalks on the south side of Edgewater, ADA access to area green space is improved.

Funding and Leverage

Investments in the Edgewater-Second Street improvements total nearly $5,000,000 including:

  • West Salem Urban Renewal Area funding: $3,500,000 in Second Street reconstruction and Edgewater improvements
  • System Development Charges: $1,300,000 in for intersection improvements at Edgewater/Rosemont
  • Businesses in the area have added new seating for outdoor dining; historic features and a bench are planned to enhance a transit stop
  • The design of Action Plan projects involved significant input from and partnership with area stakeholders, including business owners and residents, Salem Electric, the West Salem Business Association, and the West Salem Redevelopment Advisory Board.

Community Benefits

  • Action Plan projects are consistent with objectives in the West Salem URA Plan and West Salem Neighborhood Plan, including providing transportation choices, improving connections, and supporting redevelopment of the Edgewater-Wallace Road area
  • By meeting new stormwater detention and treatment standards, the 2nd Street project contributes to environmental quality Additional customer parking accommodates current and future redevelopment in the area
  • Way-finding signage, lighting, and utility undergrounding enhance the visual appeal of the area
  • Sidewalks and bulb-outs improve comfort, safety, and access for walking and biking in the district

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Salem: Mill Creek Industrial Park

The Mill Creek Industrial Park URA in Salem, Oregon is a collaborative effort between the City of Salem and the State of Oregon to provide the necessary transportation, water, and waste water infrastructure to accommodate a broad range of development ready sites for traded sector uses within a total area of 828 acres. The effort also includes the mitigation of several wetlands into a newly constructed central wetland open space area over 70 acres in size; totaling nearly 100 acres when it is completed.

Funding/Leverage

  • Urban renewal participation: Tax Increment collections from the Home Depot Rapid Deployment Center and FedEX developments are applied to low interest loans that have been provided by Business Oregon to fund the infrastructure and wetland construction projects.
  • Private participation: Land acquisition, new building construction, and a Development District Fee, at a similar rate to City of Salem System Development Charges.
  • Other public participation: A grant from Oregon Department of Transportation helped fund the road widening, traffic signal, and other transportation improvements to 3,750 feet of Aumsville Highway. The U.S. Economic Development Administration also provided a grant to help fund the construction of the 70 acre wetland site. A grant from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development Community Development Block Grant helped finance the installation of an 18 inch water main line in preparation for future water demands in the area. All of the projects were completed in 2013.

Community Benefits

  • New Jobs: 318 to date.
  • Support for local vendors: Traded sector products and services have a multiplying effect throughout the area; where suppliers grow as a result of new businesses and employment in the area.
  • Impact on the urban renewal area: Improvements to private and public infrastructure throughout the area make it easier, safer, and more reliable work and travel through the area.

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Salem: Evolution of the Riverfront Park

Riverfront Park is located on 23 acres next to downtown Salem, adjacent to the Willamette River. In the 1980s, the City utilized tax increment from the Riverfront-Downtown Urban Renewal Area, to purchase the site from Boise Cascade. After the first phase of development, Riverfront Park opened to visitors in October 1996.

Funding/Leverage

Riverfront Park – A Catalyst for Development

  • In 1998, A.C. Gilbert’s Discovery Village opened on the north side of the park. It houses a children’s science museum and science discovery playground.
  • Salem’s Riverfront Carousel opened June 2001 and was built by a citizen-based group.
  • The Eco-Earth Globe opened on the south side of the park June 30, 2003. The acid ball originally stored the acid used to break down wood chips into pulp. After cleaning, it took about five years to cover the globe with approximately 86,000 tiles.
  • The overlook, ramp, and floating boat dock were added to the park in 2005.
  • The open-air Pavilion opened in October 2005 after the Salem Rotary Club raised funds and built it as their centennial project.
  • The park is the site of annual regional events and also features an outdoor amphitheater, a children’s playground, large festival lawn sites, bike racks, restrooms, a path system throughout the park, picnic tables, park benches, and more.
  • In April 2009, the City opened the converted Union Street Railroad Pedestrian and Bicycle Bridge connecting Riverfront Park to Wallace Marine Park.
  • In 2016, the City plans to open the Peter Courtney Minto Island Bicycle and Pedestrian Bridge to connect Downtown to Minto Island. The Bridge and Trail project is possible because of funding from a variety of federal, state, and local sources, including from the Riverfront Downtown and Waterfront Urban Renewal Areas, Salem Keizer Area Transportation Study, Oregon Parks and Recreation Department, Business Oregon, and Oregon Department of Transportation.

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Salem: Hollywood Station

The Urban Renewal Agency of the City of Salem and Hollywood Renewal, LLC created a vibrant mixed-use development in the North Gateway Urban Renewal Area. The project site, bound by Portland Road (east), Brooks Street (west), Pine Street (north) and Highland Ave NE (south) included new opportunities for home ownership in the area, a state-of-the-art Salem senior center (Center 50+), and unique and supportive neighborhood retail and office uses.

Together, these projects were a much-needed catalyst for redevelopment of this northern entryway into Salem.

Funding/Leverage

Center 50+
Construction of the new senior center, Center 50+, at the corner of Portland Road and Highland Avenue, on the Agency-owned property called Hollywood Station, was completed October 2008.

The new 30,000 square foot facility has allowed for program expansion such as: the Wood Shop, Computer Lab, Lapidary, development of new programming such as the Wellness Center, and leasable space for senior service organizations.

Construction began in October 2007. The project was funded with proceeds from the sale of the existing Senior Center and a grant from the Urban Renewal Agency.

Town Homes and Retail
Local developer, Hollywood Renewal LLC, constructed 24 town homes just north of the senior center parcel and a two-story, 23,000 square foot commercial building, with retail and office space next door.

Community Benefits

  • # of new or relocated employees
  • Wage scale if appropriate
  • Support for local vendors if applicable
  • Support for local economy detailed
  • Impact on the urban renewal area

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Astoria: Garden of Surging Waves

The Garden of Surging Waves seeks to honor the experiences of the early Chinese immigrants and to celebrate their collective accomplishments and contributions to the Lower Columbia River Basin. The Garden of the Surging Waves is located in downtown Astoria where early Chinese immigrants labored and resided in the 1800s. The garden design references the 9-square grid, a fundamental organization that is commonly used in ancient Chinese culture. Significant private fundraising by the local community and the Chinese community in Portland is supporting the City of Astoria’s efforts. The garden is located directly adjacent to the downtown core and directly across the street from Astoria City Hall.

Funding/Leverage

  • Total Construction Costs $1.4 Million
  • Astor East Urban Renewal Area design grant $250,000
  • Urban Renewal construction grant $350,000 Promote Astoria funds $350,000 Remaining funds from private citizens and Foundation support
  • Donation from Mr. Huo, a Chinese philanthropist of artwork for the garden

Community Benefits

  • Gathering spot for local community Part of Heritage Square is the permanent location for Sunday Market
  • Historical and cultural education Provide outdoor space to complement downtown businesses
  • Enhances destination tourism

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Tualatin: Leveton TIF District

The Leveton Tax Increment District (LTID) was established in 1985, encompassing 377 acres. Establishment of the District was integral to the City’s economic development efforts to diversify and internationalize the local economy.

Virtually the entire District is zoned for manufacturing and industrial uses. The LTID was established to provide infrastructure and services to support industrial development, and to eliminate mining operations, which were detrimental to other industrial uses in the area.

The overall goal of the LTID was to facilitate the full industrial development of the District by removing blighting influences and by providing public improvements.

Funding/Leverage

When created, the total assessed value of the district was $3.5 million. Twenty-five years later, the assessed value increased to $259 million.

  • This dramatic increase in value was leveraged by only $36.4 million in maximum indebtedness.

Community Benefits

  • A vast majority of the public investment in the district was solely for the purpose of roadway and utility construction.
  • As a result of the publicly funded projects and the growth of the district, there are now 35 new businesses providing over 2,200 jobs in the advanced manufacturing sector.

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Talent: West Valley View

West Valley View project including investment in a new downtown street network, conceived in 2004 as a way to open up approximately 15 acres of undeveloped land immediately adjacent to the historic core, resolve a dangerous and confusing downtown intersection, and increase transportation capacity for a town projected to double in 20 years.
Extensive public input went into envisioning the future land uses and 3-leg roundabout concept. It also included identification of a new site for a popular community theater and public plaza design to be created as an amenity for future mixed use development.

Phase I which will extend Main Street to a new roundabout and create a new 36-space “parking street” will be fully completed in Fall 2015, with construction of the public plaza on excess right of way near the roundabout. Construction has taken five years in response to available funding and right-of-way acquisition. In 2008, there was also a request from the City for the URA to sunset three years early, which impacted borrowing capacity at a time when the actual land and construction costs were unknown.

The final leg of the roundabout, Phase II, has been engineered and ready to construct whenever right-of-way negotiations are successful. The success of Phase 1 and improving economy has resulted in the City doing away with the early sunset date for TURA and hopes for Phase II to be built before 2019.

Camelot Theatre, a small community theater in the heart of downtown Talent, operated in a former feed store on land that was acquired for Phase I road construction. After two-and-a-half years of negotiation, a win-win solution was created with TURA purchasing the adjacent lot so Camelot could build a new state-of-the-art theater under a leaseback arrangement. To accommodate parking for the theater and future business, TURA designed a double wide “parking street” in lieu of a traditional parking lot; today, the 100-seat theater is a key anchor to the downtown and enjoys sold out performances year round.

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Lake Oswego: Lake Theater & Cafe

The Lake Twin Theatre was designed by celebrated local architect Richard Sundeleaf and first opened its doors in 1940. For decades, the theater, located on Oswego Lake, was the center of the entertainment hub of downtown Lake Oswego. Eventually, the theatre began to fall into disrepair. Floodwaters in 1996 caused even further damage to the building. Soon after, Drew Prell, a local developer, saw an opportunity and purchased the property with the idea of restoring the building and making the theatre once again a significant attraction for downtown.
Meanwhile, the City’s Redevelopment Agency was making plans for a continuous public plaza along Oswego Lake adjacent to downtown. This included buying lakefront property adjacent to the theater. Mr. Prell and the Agency realized that by combining efforts, a remodeled theater with a new entrance directly onto the City’s new public plaza would make for a very attractive development.

In 2010, Mr. Prell and the Redevelopment Agency entered into a development agreement that obligated both parties to fund and construct a number of improvements to the theater and the new plaza. Mr. Prell remodeled the theater to include one completely upgraded auditorium with state-of-the-art cinema technology, a new screen, and all new seating. The second auditorium was converted into an events space for receptions and small concerts. This space also included similar state-of-the-art audiovisual features for showing movies and streaming live performances from around the world.

The building was expanded to include a kitchen, bar and eating area, and the front entrance was relocated to enter directly onto the City’s new plaza. The Agency built the plaza including a special raised terrace and gas fireplace for use by theater patrons and visitors for dining and other entertainment purposes. The Agency also provided a grant to Mr. Prell that funded all the exterior theater improvements so that the theater and the plaza would be more integrated. The plaza was completed in 2011 and was appropriately named, Sundeleaf Plaza, a tribute to the famous architect. The theater improvements were completed in early 2014 and it is now called the Lake Theater and Café.

Funding/Leverage

  • Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency
    • Theater improvements = $351,555
    • Plaza terrace = approx. $450,000
  • Drew Prell – Oswego Investors
    • Theater improvements = approx. $1 million

Community Benefits

  • Retention of a theater in downtown
  • Expanded entertainment and dining options
  • Preserved a building of historic significance
  • More attractive block with street appeal
  • Increased value of theater and other nearby properties

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Hillsboro: 4th Main

The City of Hillsboro and Metro jointly owned a premier redevelopment site at 350 East Main in the heart of the historic downtown retail district. The two agencies were looking for an experienced development team to create a transit supportive mixed use project which contributes to the City’s Downtown revitalization efforts. The 48,414-sq.ft. site is located within the Hillsboro Regional Center in close proximity to the Hillsboro Transit Center. The City of Hillsboro in partnership with Metro purchased the mostly-vacant parcel in 1998 while plans for the Westside MAX light rail line began to take shape. The intent was to hold the property until the time – and the market – was right for a project like 4th Main. The project broke ground in 2012 and was completed May 2014.

Work included remediation of three underground storage tanks at the same time the underground parking garage was being built; construction of 71 market rate housing units; 3,850 sq ft retail (half leased to a taproom); and remodeling a former bank building to house a local professional theatre company.

Funding/Leverage

Funding for this project was provided by the Downtown Hillsboro Urban Renewal Area, Metro Transit Oriented Development (TOD) program, Vertical Housing Development Zone, and the State’s Brownfield Loan program. Metro TOD funds of $540,000 were combined with additional City and Metro funding for a total of $2.2 million in public investments

  • Urban renewal participation – $948,625
  • Private investment – $15,325,000
  • The site was remediated concurrent with development using a Business Oregon Brownfield Loan (urban renewal funds will pay back the loan over 10 years).
  • TOD easement, land write down and SDC assistance
  • Vertical Housing Development Zone – 60% tax abatement for the building for 10 years

Community Benefits

  • 71 units of much needed downtown housing – approximately 125 new residents
  • Creation of 52 permanent jobs
  • Construction estimated to create 140 jobs and $25 million in new spending
  • Now complete, the property returns to the tax rolls generating more funds that may be invested in other development projects.
  • New residents support local restaurants, shops and the arts and culture scene Downtown

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Astoria: Liberty Theater

As stated on the Liberty Theater website: “the restoration of the Liberty Theater Complex is crucial from an historic preservation perspective. Outside of Portland or Salem, there is no other 1920s vintage motion picture palace in Oregon with so much of its original decorative architectural fabric intact.” In addition to its strong historical presence, the theater hosts a variety of events, including concerts, plays, conferences, dances, town hall meetings, weddings, school plays, and film festivals. The rehabilitation of the theater has had a positive impact on the surrounding downtown area, and the theater itself has been a magnet for commercial activity and serves as an example of the success of revitalization. The renovation of the theater has provided new and increased business for the surrounding property owners, including the Elliott Hotel, whose manager credits their $1.3 million renovation to the renovation of the Liberty Theater. Local restaurants have also seen an increase in business because of the theater crowd.

The Liberty Theater was acquired by local entrepreneurs and subsequently sold to Liberty Restoration Inc. (LRI), a non-profit operation, which began restoration efforts in 2000. The Astoria Development Commission (ADC) provided LRI an urban renewal grant in the amount of $1.3 million. The ADC also provided urban renewal funds for $300,000 for architectural, engineering, and electric improvements in Phase I of a three-phase renovation process. In 2012, the ADC approved a matching urban renewal grant of $386,000 for Phase II of the renovations. Renovations to date have cost about $9 million, and the operators of the theater are in the second phase of the renovation process.

Funding/Leverage

  • $9 Million To Date
  • Urban Renewal Acquisition $1.3 million
  • Urban Renewal Loan for architectural, engineering and electric improvements $300,000
  • Urban Renewal Matching Grant $386,000
  • Private Investment $7million (including matching grant)

Community Benefits

  • Tourism draw for business district
  • Cultural activities for the community
  • Gathering space for the community Job creation
  • Improvement to historic building

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Astoria: Fort George Brewery

The Fort George Brewery + Public House is locally owned and operated. Blue Scorcher Bakery & Cafe in on the ground floor and an addition to the Brewery which includes a restaurant/pub featuring a brick fired pizza oven on the second floor. The compound includes the Fort George Building, built in 1924 as an auto garage and service station and more recently utilized as a body and paint shop; the Lovell Building, built in 1921 as a state of the art auto dealership and one of the only buildings downtown to survive the great fire of 1922; and the Alignment Shop, whose construction date is unknown and is currently leased to Fernhill Glass where glass art is created and sold. In 2006, the Fort George Brewery and Public House leased and began building out a restaurant, brewery, and kitchen next door to the Blue Scorcher Bakery in the Fort George Building. The remodel highlights the original architecture of the building, featuring old-growth beams and hand-forged brackets, and a variety of wood furniture and metalwork that pays homage to the building’s organic industrial ambiance. In 2009, the Fort George Brewery purchased all 3 buildings and began building out the Lovell Building to house a larger production brewery to keep up with demand. All of the construction in the Lovell Building was done in the same manner as the Fort George Building, and features the building’s old-growth style.

Funding/Leverage

  • Total Project Cost
  • Urban Renewal Loan $120,000
  • UR Storefront Improvement Grant of $30,000
  • SBA 504 loan $330,000
  • Lottery Funding $150,000
  • Craft 3 private funding
  • Private Investment

Community Benefits

  • Job Creation
  • Demand for local goods
  • Serves as a meeting space for events, meetings, and conferences
  • Hosts the Columbia River Maritime Museum Education Series
  • Restoration of two derelict historic buildings
  • Support for local artists (musicians at the pub)
  • Provides craft beer to Oregon, Washington, and Idaho

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Astoria: Garden of Surging Waves

The Garden of Surging Waves seeks to honor the experiences of the early Chinese immigrants and to celebrate their collective accomplishments and contributions to the Lower Columbia River Basin. The Garden of the Surging Waves is located in downtown Astoria where early Chinese immigrants labored and resided in the 1800s. The garden design references the 9-square grid, a fundamental organization that is commonly used in ancient Chinese culture. Significant private fundraising by the local community and the Chinese community in Portland is supporting the City of Astoria’s efforts. The garden is located directly adjacent to the downtown core and directly across the street from Astoria City Hall.

Tigard: Max’s Fanno Creek Brewpub

Two separate public/private projects in adjacentMain Street buildingshelped revitalize a key node in Tigard’s downtown in 2013. Building owner George Diamond converted12564 SW Main Street’s deteriorated second story that had been vacant for over a decade into 6000 square feet of professional office space. The neighboring Max’s Fanno Creek Brewpub undertook a major façade improvement project including new signage, awning, lighting and outdoor seating -attracting more customers to the family-friendly brewpub.

Funding/Leverage

  • The City Center Development Agency (Tigard’s urban renewal agency) invested $25,000 matching façade improvement grants to each of the two projects, leveraging approximately 10 times that amount in private investment.
  • Both projects participated in the Façade Improvement Program and received design assistance from on-retainer architects.
  • The owner of 12564 SW Main Street invested $500,000 into the new building facade, 2nd floor tenant improvements, and seismic upgrades. The owner of Max’s Fanno Creek Brewpub invested $55,000 in façade and landscaping improvements.

Community Benefits

  • The owner of Pacific Community Design, an engineering, surveying and planning firm, chose to relocatehis growing firm to the newly developed space in 12564 SW Main Street specificallyso he and his employees could work within walking distance to restaurants and cafés. Additionally, he knew they would have access to the nearby Tigard Transit Center/WES Station,and enjoy being near the Fanno Creek Trail (a regional trail popular for recreational and commuter cycling).
  • A growing firm with twenty-five professional jobs was attracted to downtown. These employees frequent the mostly locally owned restaurants and retail businesses on Main Street.
  • The two buildings are directly adjacent to downtown’s key natural amenity, Fanno Creek. Thisprominent public/private investment has inspired other business owners to upgrade their buildings.

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The Dalles: Sunshine Mill

The property consists of 2.4 acres of land, which had 12 nested concrete grain silos, a six story concrete flour mill building and a partially demolished brick warehouse building. The property is surrounded on three sides by street and rail-road right-of-way.

The property was purchased by the Agency in 2005 and leased with option to buy to the developer. In
May 2013 the buy option was exercised. The final terms of the purchase were three large payments. The first two were one year apart; the final payment was six months after the second.

In addition, the developer took out bank loans for the redevelopment. The Agency provided capital to pay a portion of the interest on those loans through an interest rate buy-down program.

Ancillary to the main project was a street redesign with a round-about and streetscape. This was partially funded by revenue from the sale of the real property. The roundabout was a Oregon State Department of Transportation project. The Urban Renewal Agency used the ODOT project as an opportunity to put in a streetscape project at the location.

In addition the wine maker purchased 450 acres and planted grapes for the winery near The Dalles.

Funding/Leverage

  • Property purchased in 2005 for $251,417; sold in 2013 for $309,700
  • $632,752 redevelopment loan from the Agency
  • Private participation
  • UR-ODOT Streetscape and Roundabout

Community Benefits

  • 81 employees involved in the vineyard, grape processing and bottling; 50 employees are involved in the wine tasting and retail facility.
  • Assessed Property Value in 2005 was $383,420 with taxes at $8,320.18
  • Assessed Property Value is 2014 was 658,194 with taxes at $13,886.10
  • The property is currently going through a special assessment by Oregon DOR. Due to this, the total impact on the UR Area is not known.

The Real Market Value has increased $307,270 and is expected to increase further once the DOR assessment is complete.

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Hood River: State Street Renovation

The State Street project includes upgrading of State Street, one of the main transportation routes through downtown Hood River, just one street south of Oak Street, the main street in the downtown. The project included a new road bed, paving, sidewalks, curbs, streetscape, replacing sewer and water lines and undergrounding utilities. The project also included a restroom facility in support of the Oregon Department of Transportation Columbia River Gorge bike route project, also known as the ODOT Bike Hub Project. The communities along the historic highway from Wood Village to The Dalles have banded together to develop a system of Gorge Hubs along the historic Columbia River Highway. By working together, the communities will leverage resources and ensure consistency along the corridor. The Gorge Hubs will provide a “visual handshake” of sorts for those who visit our communities whether they arrived by bike or plan on hiking our trails or exploring the beauty of the Columbia River Gorge by way of the historic Columbia River Highway.

Funding/Leverage

  • The total cost of the State Street project was $5.7 million, 4.9 million in construction and the remainder in design work, all of which was funded through urban renewal
  • Since this project is just completed, we will look to the future to see the impacts on the community.
  • Installation of the restroom helps facilitate the ODOT Bike Hub Project.

Community Benefits

  • improved utility infrastructure to support businesses in the area
  • improved transportation network including pedestrian facilities to support both businesses in the area, residents, and tourists
  • support for shoppers and tourists by providing a restroom in the area
  • cooperation with another government entity (ODOT) to help support the Historic Columbia River Highway and State Trail project.

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Portland: Pacific NW College of Art

Pacific Northwest College of Art (PNCA) is a leading West Coast art and design college. Founded in Portland, Oregon in 1909, PNCA has helped shape the region’s visual art and design landscape for more than a century.

The Portland Development Commission (PDC) was a significant partner in the development of PNCA’s new home. PDC was granted a deed for the 511 NW Broadway building from the National Park Service through a national monument transfer and agreed to lease the building back to PNCA for 99 years at $1 per year. With support from the City of Portland, the PDC also committed to $20.3 million in bridge and long-term financing to PNCA for the project. PNCA also received a $740,000 grant from PDC for project planning and design.

The 511 Building, which is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, had been seismically unreinforced, functionally challenged, financially unfeasible to develop on a speculative basis, and has been targeted by the federal government for disposition for more than 20 years.

Funding/Leverage

Sources: $20,320,000 total commitment

  • $12,710,000 – Short Term Bridge
    • $5,260,000 repaid from Historic Tax Credits upon occupancy
    • $3,800,000 reduced from New Market Tax Credit
    • $3,650,000 from capital campaign (5 year campaign)
  • $7,610,000 – Long Term

Community Benefits

  • Renovation and repurpose of iconic historic structure
  • Long-term stability and credibility to the area, bridge between Portland’s Pearl District and Old Town/Chinatown
  • Activates the district with 500+ students and faculty, creating a significant positive impact on surrounding business
  • Provides PNCA ability to increase enrollment
  • Location for community events
  • Creates 400 temporary jobs, approximately 50 jobs relocated from other areas , additional employment as enrollment increases

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Hood River: Hampton Inn and Suites

The Hampton Inn and Suites is developing an 88 room hotel in the Hood River waterfront urban renewal area, supporting the tourist and waterfront activity in Hood River. As part of this project, the urban renewal agency purchased a 2.88 acre parcel from the private developer in order to create a passive park on the property. This project is presently under construction, scheduled to be completed in the spring of 2016.

Funding/Leverage

  • Urban renewal financing of $395,000. No interest is due on this payment, and no payment is due until the hotel is fully built and increment from the development is received by the urban renewal agency.
  • If the hotel is not constructed, the park would revert to the city of Hood River
  • anticipated private developer investment of $5,775,000 (permit value) to develop the Hampton Inn and Suites

Community Benefits

  • 51 FTE jobs, 31 at the hotel, 10 for indirect suppliers, and tend for spending from the direct and indirect hires
  • an estimated annual payment of $162,002 the city of Hood River general fund if the hotel reaches 65% occupancy
  • an annual payment of $54,000 to Hood River visitors Council also estimated from 65% occupancy of the hotel
  • development of the 2.88 acre passive park, to be kept in a natural state

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Veneta: Fern Ridge Service Center

The new Fern Ridge Service Center in downtown Veneta replaces the Tony Garcia Center which served the Fern Ridge community for over 40 years.
Having outgrown the Garcia Center, the partners joined together with the City of Veneta with the vision to build a new center.

Urban Renewal funds made it possible to purchase a site in downtown Veneta for a new service center as well as fund needed street and infrastructure improvements. These funds helped leverage Community Development Block Grant Funds for construction of the center.

The non-profit partners; Lane Council of Government Senior Meals and Senior Connections, and Mid Lane Cares Love Project Food Pantry provide the area’s senior and low-income populations with critical health, welfare, and basic human needs services. Annually, they serve over 8,000 community members with the help of over 400 volunteers.

Funding/Leverage

The project was made possible with a $1.5 million Community Development Block Grant from Business Oregon Infrastructure Finance Authority, $250,000 Ford Family Foundation grant, $50,000 Oregon Community Foundation grant and local contributions to fund $1.82 million in construction costs. The Veneta Urban Renewal Agency provided $349,360 in land, street improvements, and infrastructure for a total project of $2.2 million.

Community Benefits

This new Center, positioned in the heart of Veneta, will serve as a catalyst for continued economic and social vitality. In this pivotal time for Veneta and the Fern Ridge area, the City hopes to capture momentum from this project and propel the area into a period of manageable growth and economic success, attracting businesses, visitors and residents, who will continue to give back to the community.

  • The new Fern Ridge Service Center includes:
    7,400 square feet of dining, meeting, office, and storage space –more than triple the space of the previous facility. Improved building access, waiting areas, and parking and loading area.
  • Offices and meeting space to provide greater privacy for visitors and volunteers.
  • Upgraded kitchen, with walk-in freezer/cooler, energy efficient appliances, and large pantry storage areas

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The Dalles: Commodore II

The Commodore building was constructed in 1908. It is a four-story 48,800 square foot mixed use building. The building remained occupied until repeated and unresolved code violations resulted in the building being vacated. In 2000 the building was condemned. In 2001 the building was purchased by the Urban Renewal Agency for $258,000. At the time the condemned assessed value on the building was $189,640.

In 2002 the Agency carried a contract for purchase and loan on the building for $282,445. The developer leveraged granted funds for loans and equity to develop low-income housing unit on the 2nd and 3rd floor with office space on the 4th floor and mixed retail on the ground level. In addition Oregon Housing and community Services (OHCS) provided $500,000 in low-income housing tax credits.

To provide parking for the residential units the Agency granted $150,000 to develop a 40 space parking lot one block from the Commodore building. Another $350,000 was granted by the Agency to leverage other funding and complete the project. These grants leveraged private equity, private loans and HUD-Low Income Housing Tax Credit (LIHTC).

Funding/Leverage

  • $500,000 Agency Grant & $500,000 OHCS-HOME Grant leveraged; $3,059,239 LIHTC Equity; $572,280 Historic Tax Credit; $229,724 Private Equity and $452,000 Primary Mortgage Loan.
  • Urban renewal participation $500,000
  • Private participation $229,724
  • Other public participation $4,131,519

Community Benefits

Ground floor business current employs eight new positions, mixed professional and retail services

  • 40 low income housing units in the core of downtown The assessed value in 2001 was $189,640 and the property was condemned. Taxes for that year were $3,572.
  • The Assessed Value in 2014 was $195,270 with a Historic Tax Exemption. Taxes for that year were $3,443.

This property is currently under Historic Tax Exemption until 2017. The 2014 Real Market Value was $9,141,360.

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Estacada: Broadway Street Improvement

The Broadway Street improvement project in Estacada rebuilt all public amenities in a three block area of downtown. The construction spanned from January 2015 to May 2015. A volunteer advisory committee and a volunteer public art selection committee participated in the process. Power lines were placed underground by Portland General Electric. Sidewalks were widened from 9’9” to 12 feet. Artist designed custom benches, bike racks and banner poles were installed. Amenities include raised planters, decorative streetlights, and concrete pavers. Community members submitted words and phrases to be embedded in sidewalks at the intersections. There is also provision for new daily art with installation of blackboard sections throughout the sidewalk in the downtown area.

Funding/Leverage

  • $1.9 M loan: Umpqua bank
  • 100% Urban Renewal

Community Benefits

  • a new facelift for the downtown
  • inclusion of the community in the design and implementation
  • 4 vacancies filled in the project zone during the pre-construction and construction periods: 9-11 jobs created
  • increase in local developer interest
  • increase in public support for Urban Renewal
  • inspired $14,000 of privately-funded public art

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Bandon: Face Rock Creamery

The City undertook and completed negotiations with the owners of the newly incorporated Face Rock Creamery, LLC, for leasing a portion of the City’s property to develop the new cheese factory. Under the terms of the lease, Face Rock Creamery was required to utilize their own funds and obtain private financing to construct and operate a new 6,000 square foot cheese factory. The rent includes a flat fee of $40 per month to cover the portion of the land dedicated to non-cheese/non-ice cream retail sales, plus an in-lieu of rent payment of 1% of gross revenues from all sales between $1 million and $2.5 million, plus 2% of gross revenues from all sales over $2.5 million. The initial lease term is 20 years, with options to renew for three subsequent 10 year terms, subject to renegotiating the rent charges. Leasing the property instead of selling it reduced the out-of-pocket expenses for Face Rock Creamery, and allowed the City to retain the asset. For its part, the City agreed to use a portion of its Urban Renewal funds to place the existing overhead utilities underground; relocate and upgrade the adjacent entrance road; install underground drainage, a public parking lot, sidewalks, and a small tourist park; and construct public restrooms. The City amended the boundary of the Coquille Valley Enterprise Zone to include the cheese factory property. This allowed Face Rock Creamery to take advantage of the property tax abatement available through the Enterprise Zone program. The City also allocated to the new cheese factory project the water, sewer, transportation, and drainage system development charge (SDC) credits from the former cheese factory that came with the property purchase. The ownership of those SDC credits remains with the City, but they are essentially being leased to Face Rock Creamery. This reduced the overall out-of-pocket private sector development cost by a significant amount, while still allowing the City to retain ownership of those SDC credits. Although public restrooms had been planned for many years and the capital funds were available through Urban Renewal, a major consideration was finding a long term resource for paying for the restroom operating, maintenance, and cleaning costs. Under the terms of the lease, Face Rock Creamery agreed to be responsible for opening, closing, cleaning, and providing the expendable supplies for the restrooms.

Funding/Leverage

  • $4.5 million total costs
  • $500,000 urban renewal purchase of property
  • $1.5 million from urban renewal for public infrastructure and restrooms
  • Face Rock Creamery secured loans from the Port of Bandon Business Development Fund, Craft3 Bank, and Business Oregon as well as owner’s capital, for a total private investment of $2.5 million.
  • In-kind contributions by Bandon Electric Department for off-site electric system improvements
  • Cooperation for utility undergrounding

Community Benefits

  • 15 full time employees
  • Other additional employment for delivery, transportation, milk truck drivers as well as the temporary employees during construction
  • Tourist attraction that will impact entire community
  • New market for local dairy farmers for their milk

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Hood River: Waterfront

In 2008, the city of Hood River and the Port of Hood River collaborated on the Hood River Waterfront Urban Renewal Area. The area contains the Waterfront Park on the riverside of Portway, Avenue and an industrial area to the south of Portway, Avenue. The industrial area was underdeveloped and lacked adequate infrastructure for significant development to occur. The urban renewal agency entered into an agreement with the Port of Hood River for the port to finance improvements to Portway, Avenue to be repaid in the future with tax increment proceeds. These improvements widened Portway Avenue, installed sidewalks, curbs, gutters, and street trees. The resulting growth in the Area has been dramatic.

Funding/Leverage

  • Two loans between the Agency and the Port of Hood River: $257,949 and $236,592. Loans to be repaid out of tax increment proceeds
  • The addition of 317,000 sf of industrial uses in completed projects for a total investment of $40,371,245
  • $1.2 million investment in Anchor Way and Portway Avenue by the Port of Hood River
  • 380 direct jobs in completed projects
  • an additional 185,000 sf of industrial uses under development for a total investment of $31,300,000
  • 225 jobs projected in projects under development

Community Benefits

  • 380 jobs in completed projects, 225 jobs under development, and another 250 jobs in potential development beginning in 2017
  • new restaurants have been developed at the waterfront servicing the entire community
  • development of a waterfront bike and pedestrian trail and open space along the west edge of Nichols Basin
  • construction of the pedestrian bridge trail and kiosks
  • development of a passive park

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Lake Oswego: Lake View Village

Lake View Village anchors Lake Oswego’s shopping district and works together with the adjacent Millennium Plaza Park to create a strong sense of place and gathering place for the community. The six retail/office buildings on the 2.3 acre downtown block surround a 365 space parking garage. The quality of the design and the attention to detail within the pedestrian realm is what attracts shoppers, restaurant patrons and strollers to this site.

Lake View Village is the result of a public/private partnership between the City of Lake Oswego’s Redevelopment Agency and Gramor Development, Inc. The Redevelopment Agency assembled the land and sold the developable portion to Gramor for retail and office redevelopment. In addition, the Agency provided $4.5 million toward the cost of the public parking structure, which is maintained by Gramor.

The goals for the project called for a development that would be more than just a place to shop. This project was intended to help revitalize downtown, enhance the downtown’s “sense-of-place” and to fit into the existing fabric of the downtown in a manner that would further Lake Oswego’s vision of a pedestrian-oriented, mixed-use urban village.

Funding/Leverage

Funding for this project was provided by the Lake Oswego Redevelopment Agency and Gramor Development.

Total = Approximately $34.8 million

  • LORA: $6,800,000.
    • $4,600,000 for the garage.
  • Gramor Development: Approximately $22,000,000.
  • Tenants: $6,000,000.

Community Benefits

  • Over 300 new jobs created
  • More than $25 million in new retail sales each year
  • Provides the community 20 times the original tax revenue for the property
  • Four restaurants, 14 retail tenants and 10 office tenants
  • 365 parking spaces: 183 full-time public parking spaces and 182 available for public parking during certain times

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Madras: Inn at the Cross Keys

The Madras Redevelopment Commission (MRC) identified the need for an additional hotel in downtown Madras. The MRC sought a developer to construct an aesthetically pleasing 60 + room hotel that included a covered entry way, pool, and public meeting room.

Funding/Leverage

  • $525,000 performance based grant
  • $4,175,000 private investment
  • $4,700,000 Total Investment

Community Benefits

  • Approximately 15 new employees
  • $4,175,000 of additional tax assessed value to Urban Renewal District
  • Hotel accommodates additional tourism lodging demands in Central Oregon
  • Many seminars, meetings, and events are held in the public meeting room each year
  • Approximately 50,000 in transient room tax

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